Nicki Bluhm, Eric Krasno, Grahame Lesh, And Ross James Are Performing At Terrapin Crossroads For Free Tonight!

first_imgYesterday, Terrapin Crossroads, the iconic venue in San Rafael, California, owned by the Grateful Dead bassist Phil Lesh, announced that they had a special event in store tonight. This evening, Nicki Bluhm, Eric Krasno, Grahame Lesh, and Ross James will all come together and perform as part of Songs To Fill The Air series in the backyard of Terrapin Crossroad. The event is free to the public and an all-ages affair, with food and drinks available for attendees. The show starts at 5:30, and those who can make it are probably not going to want to be late. Following the free performance, Ross James will perform inside as part of his Cosmic Thursdays.last_img

Help for Cambridge youths

first_imgHarvard Medical School (HMS) faculty members are working with the city of Cambridge to provide mental health services in partnership with police, schools, and youth services programs, as part of a wide-ranging effort to keep kids out of court.Since its founding in 2007, the Cambridge Safety Net Collaborative has successfully diverted hundreds of Cambridge youths into structured activities — such as athletic leagues and after-school programs — and linked them to counseling and mental health services, when needed.James Barrett, an instructor in psychology in HMS’s Department of Psychiatry and with the Harvard-affiliated Cambridge Health Alliance, heads the mental health assessment and treatment part of the program. Barrett meets with representatives of the other key organizations involved — Cambridge police, schools, and the Department of Human Service Programs — every other week. Together, they review cases involved with the Safety Net Collaborative and refer them to an appropriate program.Safety Net got its start in 2007, when Robert Haas arrived as Cambridge’s police commissioner. In surveying the department, Haas, who had served as the state’s secretary of public safety, realized there were limited options for officers dealing with juvenile crime. The officers could arrest the kids, disperse them, or send them home to their parents.Haas launched a youth and family services unit, assigning a handful of officers to deal exclusively with young people. The program developed ties with the schools and youth centers and approached the health alliance to provide mental health assessment and services.A diversion program is important, Haas said, because once young people become involved with the criminal justice system, more trouble tends to follow.“There’s lots of research that once a kid is in the court system, it’s difficult to get them on another path,” Haas said. “We tried to move from a reactive model to a preventive one.”The program has evolved, Haas said, and youth officers today are looked at as resources rather than merely agents of enforcement.  Officers have been trained to recognize red flags in behavior that indicate a role for Safety Net, Barrett said. Each officer has Barrett’s cellphone and pager numbers.“It really is a role shift for these police officers,” said Barrett.In the years since the program was founded, it has expanded to serve younger kids. Now it routinely receives referrals for fifth, sixth, and seventh graders, rather than the older teens targeted when the program started. Some referrals come from youth resource officers noticing behavior on the streets, or from teachers concerned about classroom behavior. Some come from parents.That means the youths tend to have been involved in relatively minor issues, such as running away from home or exhibiting defiant behavior, Haas said. The result, according to Barrett and William Pollack, an associate clinical professor of psychology at HMS and senior consultant to Safety Net, is that the programs have been able to divert kids before they are involved in outright crimes.“When teenagers get into trouble, it tends to be more serious. Often there’s a legal charge,” Barrett said. “It has gotten to be more preventative than we had even hoped.”Too often, youths are ignored outside the schools until they get into trouble, Pollack said. In a city like Cambridge, with a wealth of resources — it has five youth centers —Safety Net helps to coordinate resources and reduce the chance that kids will fall through the cracks.“You often see disconnects between youth workers, police, and mental health. [In this case] they’re all connected, with Harvard and Harvard Medical School” nearby, Pollack said. “Unfortunately, our interventions for youth, especially around crime and criminal behavior, [often] occur out of fear when a major event occurs. People say, first we have to have safety, then we have to do something.”Officials involved with Safety Net shared their experiences with authorities on juvenile crime and diversion programs from around the country in October, during a workshop convened at the Harvard Faculty Club.Safety Net currently serves about 70 young people, though the number can vary. While there are more boys than girls in the program, girls make up a sizeable minority.Barrett and Pollack are beginning an in-depth assessment of the program, though there is anecdotal evidence of its effectiveness. Just two Cambridge juveniles were arrested last summer, and city officials have recently noticed fewer kids with a history with the courts applying for city jobs programs.“It’s gone well beyond my expectations when I took over,” Haas said. “It’s really been a remarkable partnership.”last_img read more

Saint Mary’s encourages students to receive vaccination at Sunday’s Flu Fest

first_imgSaint Mary’s will be hosting an outdoor Flu Fest and Blood Drive on Sunday at the lacrosse fields from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Though students can no longer reserve a shot, walk-ins are still accepted. The College is incentivizing students to attend with free food, games and prizes.A Wednesday email from Cynthia Horton-Cavanaugh, the interim director of Health and Counseling, said more than 500 students signed up to get their flu shot at the Fest.“All Saint Mary’s students who attend classes on campus are strongly encouraged to take part in this event,” she said in the email. “Bring your insurance card and we can bill your insurance for you. Otherwise we will bill the $20 vaccination fee to your student account. If you do not have insurance, the flu shot will be covered by the Emergency Fund.” Katie Knisely, assistant athletic trainer and healthcare administrator at Saint Mary’s, noted the importance of receiving a flu shot this year. “Now since the temperature is starting to drop, people will most likely be spending extra time inside of buildings in a confined area with more people and at a greater risk of exposure,” she said.This year’s vaccination has been designed to fight against four different flu viruses, an email from the College said. Knisley said the flu shot can lower one’s risk of getting the flu or other related infections.“Getting the flu shot could help decrease the chances of getting the flu and help prevent co-infections,” she said.Saint Mary’s is working to make the flu vaccine easily accessible through the fest, Knisley said, and The Observer has found many students are planning on attending Sunday’s Flu Fest. Sophomore Kathleen McLeod said she is getting a shot to protect her family and friends from getting sick. “The decision to get [my flu shot] this year was a no brainer,” she said. “I would never want to be responsible for giving the flu to a friend or family member and get them really sick.” Senior JoAnna Keilman  said she wants to maintain her health during the pandemic. “Honestly, I have not gotten my flu shot since I have been in college, and it did not affect me until I got the flu in February,” she said. “I want to take every precaution to stay healthy during this time, especially so we can stay on campus.”Sophomore Lauren Lambros said bringing any virus home is not an option. “My mom has a compromised immune system, so getting vaccinated has always been super important to me just to protect not only my own immune system but hers as well,” she said. “Now with COVID, having a strong immune system is more important than ever to protect ourselves and the members of our SMC community who are immunocompromised.”The first one hundred students who signed up to get their shots will received a free t-shirt from the College. Those attending the event are encouraged to wear short sleeves for easy access to the recipient’s vaccine administration location.Tags: COVID-19, Flu shots, Saint Mary’s Collegelast_img read more

Asian Development Bank approves $600 million loan for renewable energy development in Indonesia

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:The Asian Development Bank (ADB) on Tuesday approved a $600 million loan for Indonesian state utility Perusahaan Listrikk Negara (PLN) to expand electricity access and promote renewable energy.The loan is part of the second phase of an electricity grid development programme covering the outer regions of Kalimantan, Maluku, and Papua in the east of the country, which began in 2017.“The programme will increase PLN’s delivery of electricity powered by renewable energy to remote communities by six-fold and reduce indoor kerosene and wood consumption, which is expected to generate significant environmental and social benefits,” ADB Energy specialist Diana Connett said in a statement.Indonesia’s government aims to have 23% of energy coming from renewable sources by 2025, up from around 9% in July, but progress on renewable projects has been slow.The country has over 400 gigawatts potential capacity for sources like hydropower, solar and geothermal, but only around 2.5% had been utilised, according to government data. It hopes to simplify pricing for electricity from renewables to encourage more investment in the sector.[Tabita Diela]More: ADB approves $600 mln loan for Indonesia’s PLN for renewable power Asian Development Bank approves $600 million loan for renewable energy development in Indonesialast_img read more