Bob Weir, Patti Smith, & Flea To Headline San Francisco’s ‘Pathway To Paris’ Benefit Concert

first_imgPathway To Paris is a concert that coincides with the Global Climate Action Summit, bringing together high-profile musicians, artists, activists, politicians, and other public figures to advocate for cities to work to address climate change. The event takes its name from the Paris Agreement, a global agreement secured by the U.N. that encourage countries to mitigate their greenhouse-gas emissions, and seeks to encourage cities to meet and exceed the Paris Agreement’s climate targets.On September 14th, the fourth-annual Pathway To Paris concert will be held at San Francisco’s Masonic. Heading the lineup is Patti Smith, the famed singer-songwriter and poet whose daughter, Jesse Parris Smith, co-founded the event with Rebecca Foon (both of whom will also appear during the show). Also headlining is Bob Weir, the famed Grateful Dead guitarist, and Flea, bassist for the Red Hot Chili Peppers. Other musicians on the bill include Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame inductee Eric Burdon, formerly of War and The Animals, Tibetan musician and activist Tenzin Choegyla, and French pop-soul singer Imany.In addition to the musical performances, Icelandic visual artist Olafur Eliasson has created a special interactive piece for Pathway to Paris, which will engage the audience in a collaborative work of art. As noted in a press release, “Artist Olafur Eliasson will turn the whole audience into artists by creating an interactive collective artwork. Eliasson leads a choreography that motions its audience to hold up a Little Sun solar lantern. The result is a visually striking solar-powered ‘sunrise’ which raises awareness for climate action and energy equality.”As noted by Jesse Paris Smith,In the world of music, the best way to improve is through collaboration. This is the same with the critical issue of climate change. We must join together to make this the most ambitious collaboration of our century. We will not be able to implement crucial and challenging solutions to climate change, plastic pollution, and all urgent environmental problems as long as we stand divided. Inseparable from the issue of climate change is the need for world peace, global communication, and an international collaboration unmatched by any event in human history.All proceeds from the fourth-annual Pathway to Paris concert will be donated to 350.org, Pathway to Paris, and the United Nations Development Programme. Tickets go on sale this Friday, July 13th, at 10 a.m. (PT) via LiveNation.com, with tickets also available via all Ticketmaster outlets and by phone. For more information, head here.last_img read more

Flexible leadership helped save Boston Marathon bombing victims

first_img Read Full Story On the afternoon of April 13, 2013, after two bombs exploded at the Boston Marathon, scores of severely injured people were rushed to hospitals across the city. Although three people died at the scene and many had life-threatening injuries, everyone who was transported to a hospital lived.How was it that so many people were able to survive?A new study outlines some of the challenges that arose in Boston hospitals in the wake of the bombing, as well as successes. One of the key reasons why so many lives were saved, the researchers found, was the high level of flexibility and autonomous decision-making among physician leaders.The study involved experts from the National Preparedness Leadership Initiative (NPLI)—a joint venture of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health’s Division of Policy Translation and Leadership Development and the Harvard Kennedy School’s Center for Public Leadership—and colleagues from Boston hospitals and several Israeli institutions. Since the bombing, NPLI—which focuses on equipping leaders for crises—has been studying the tragedy, hoping to draw useful lessons.“We study crises and we teach leaders for times of crises,” said Leonard Marcus, lecturer on public health practice at Harvard Chan School, co-director of NPLI, and a study author. “This was one of many events we follow. The difference here was that this was in our own backyard.”last_img read more

US judge paves way for extradition of American father, son accused of sneaking ex-Nissan boss Carlos Ghosn out of Japan

first_imgBOSTON (AP) — US judge paves way for extradition of American father, son accused of sneaking ex-Nissan boss Carlos Ghosn out of Japan.last_img

Premier League braced for TV losses as player protests mount

first_img“We were able to update our clubs today on our situation with broadcasters, which is obviously confidential,” said Premier League CEO Richard Masters.”Whatever happens, there’s going to be significant loss of revenue for clubs. That is inevitable.”We were able to paint a picture today about what would happen in various scenarios, playing out the season and not playing out the season, to allow them to have a picture of that as we stand in the early part of May.”The rebate to broadcasters would surge to an estimated £760 million if the season cannot be completed. Masters has previously warned of a £1 billion loss once the absence of gate receipts is taken into account. Player fears However, England internationals Raheem Sterling and Danny Rose are the two latest high-profile players to raise their concerns over a return to contact sport when the rest of society is being advised to follow social-distancing guidelines. “The moment we do go back it just needs to be a moment where it’s not just for footballing reasons, it’s safe for not just us footballers but the whole medical staff, referees,” Sterling told his YouTube channel.”[I am] not scared, but reserved and thinking what the worst outcome could be.”I’ve had friends whose grandma has passed away, I’ve had family members as well that have passed away.”British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said in parliament on Monday that the return of sport on TV would “provide a much-needed boost to national morale” in a country that has been one of the worst hit by the global pandemic, with the government officially recording more than 32,000 deaths from COVID-19.”People’s lives are at risk,” Rose, who is on loan at Newcastle from Tottenham, told an Instagram live.”Football shouldn’t even be spoken about coming back until the numbers have dropped massively.”But Gordon Taylor, the chief executive of England’s Professional Footballers’ Association, said many of his members would be open to playing again provided “everything that can be done is being done” to assure their safety. “We’ve got to try it, see if we can do it and see if we can return to some form of activity,” Taylor told the Mirror.”But it’s also being as careful and having as many assurances as possible that it’s achievable.” Premier League clubs face having to pay a huge refund to broadcasters even if they manage to complete the coronavirus-disrupted season behind closed doors.Broadcasters would be reimbursed for matches not being played as scheduled and the lack of atmosphere in empty stadiums is also a factor.The BBC reported the bill facing the English top-flight, which continued talks on “Project Restart” on Monday, could be as high as £340 million ($420 million). For the first time on Monday, the 20 Premier League clubs discussed models that may have to be used to decide final standings if it is not deemed safe to resume.New government guidelines have paved the way for elite sport to return behind closed doors in England from June 1. Complications The Premier League are due to meet the PFA and the managers’ union later this week to discuss protocols for a return to group training. A further complication for Project Restart is where any matches would be played, with the clubs opposed to a proposal for a limited number of neutral venues to be used.The UK’s national football policing lead, previously stated resuming matches on a home-and-away basis would “present challenges” to the emergency services.But Mark Roberts said on Tuesday that police, government and football authorities were working together on a plan “which minimizes any risks to public safety and unnecessary pressure on public services, but facilitates a sensible restart to the season.”London Mayor Sadiq Khan has come out against the idea of playing matches in the capital at this stage, with the city having been particularly badly hit by the pandemic.Five of the 20 Premier League sides are based in London.”With the country still in the grips of this crisis, and hundreds of people dying every day, he believes that it is too early to be discussing the resumption of the Premier League and top-flight sport in the capital,” Khan’s spokesperson told the Evening Standard.Topics :last_img read more

Forest City man charged with threatening people with a rifle

first_imgFOREST CITY — The preliminary hearing has been scheduled for a Forest City man accused of threatening people with a rifle last week. Court documents say three men from Fertile went to the home of 41-year-old Joshua Winders late Thursday afternoon, with two of the men being allowed inside the home with the third waiting in a vehicle. Winders allegedly grabbed a .22-caliber rifle and pointed it at the men inside his home, then followed them outside and fired multiple shots into the ground while yelling at the men to get off of his property, located in the 2000 block of River Road. Winders allegedly threatened to “spray” their vehicle if they did not leave. The men drove away from Winders’ residence, calling 9-1-1, saying they feared for their safety. Winders was later arrested and charged with intimidation with a dangerous weapon with the intent to injure or provoke fear, possession of a firearm by a felon, and three counts of assault while displaying a dangerous weapon. Winders is due in court for his preliminary hearing this Thursday. If convicted of all the charges, Winders could face up to 21 years in prison.last_img read more