Panorama Expands “THE LAB” With An All-New Collection Of Immersive Art And Dynamic Technology

first_imgThis July, Panorama will return to New York City for a second year with performances from Nine Inch Nails, Frank Ocean, Tame Impala, A Tribe Called Quest, alt-J, Solange, Justice, Nick Murphy, MGMT and more. Part of what makes the music festival so engaging is its massive dedication to art installations.Panorama returns this summer with an all-new lineup of artistry and even more innovation at THE LAB, powered by HP. Building on the success of last year’s debut, THE LAB’s museum-quality exhibition space has been expanded to include additional interactive, experiential digital art installations, fusing technology, art, performance and design at the center of Panorama. Curated exclusively by New York City-based artists, THE LAB puts the city’s unparalleled creativity and innovation on display for a sensory adventure culminating in a massive 360 degree dome theater.HP is once again on board as the official technology sponsor for Panorama and will be setting up in THE LAB, working with digital artists and HP Z Workstations to build out the full scale experience for festival goers.At the heart of THE LAB is The Exhibition, a showcase of New York City’s local talent and innovation with a series of dynamic and immersive art installations driven by technology. Artists designing installations include Prism, SOFTlab, FutureWife, Ekene Ijeoma, Emilie Baltz, and The Windmill Factory. THE LAB is curated by META.IS.Artist Installations included at The Exhibition at THE LAB Future Portrait created by PrismFuture Portrait transforms motion into an amazing dynamic film. Your performance drives uniquely beautiful animation that can be remixed and shared on the fly. Discover a new you defined by movement.Volume created by SOFTlabAn interactive cube of responsive mirrors that redirect light and sound as a volume that reflects the excitement of surrounding festival goers. Volume uses mirrors, light, and sound as fundamental building elements to remix the character of the festival goers and gaze back at them with empathy and exuberance.Boolean Planet created by Future WifeA monolithic sphere beckons nearby entities to form gravity wells with the weight of their bodies, slicing through celestial veils to reveal the unseen worlds beneath the surface.Heartfelt created by Ekene IjeomaHeartfelt is a participatory interactive installation which engages participants in holding hands and letting electricity flow through them to turn on lights and play sounds. It uses participants’ bodies as conductors to close the circuit of socio-political polarization, creating a shared experience of solitary and interconnectivity.Dream Machine created by Unicorns ExistThe Dream Machine is a multi-player, olfactory organ performance that combines smell with sound, touch and light in a single interactive experience.Right Passage created by The Windmill FactoryRight Passage is a room scale sound and light performance installation.  You begin in a massive hazed void.  A reflective labyrinth emerges, guiding you towards warmth.  A rite of passage, a journey from darkness to light, a disorientation of the senses.The Dome – a standout at last year’s festival – is set to return with all-new, original content and 30% bigger this year. Visually produced by Dirt Empire with original music, sound design, and spherical audio spatialization by Danny Bensi and Saunder Jurriaans, the 90-foot dome allows more than 250 festivalgoers at a time to experience the 360 degree immersive theater and provides its viewers with an unparalleled collective sensory experience. Proclaimed by the Observer as “the selling point of THE LAB,” The Dome is where Panorama’s synthesis of art, technology, music and design is given its ultimate expression. [photo via Panorama Facebook]last_img read more

Aikey collects Sunoco bonus on record night at Indee

first_imgINDEPENDENCE, Iowa (May 23) – One of Independence Motor Speedway’s winningest drivers went home with a bonus following his latest checkered flag run, on a record setting opening night.  By Jerry Mackey The headliner of the night was the 25-lap IMCA Sunoco Late Model feature. Jeff Aikey drew the pole position and went on to drive the Rick Dralle-owned no. 77 to a comfortable win. The race went flag to flag with Aikey taking the win and first $250 Sunoco Race Fuels bonus of the season over Eric Pollard and Sean Johnson.  Saturday mid-day rains made for very challenging conditions at Indee but thanks to the never say die attitude of co-promoter Justin Temeyer, the new season got underway on Saturday night with­out fans in attendance due to the Covid-19 restrictions. The record 161 drivers in attendance gave a very big shout out to Temeyer and partner Mick Trier for making the racing happen.  Kaden Reynolds established himself as a driver to be reckoned with in the IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stock division. Reynolds took the action packed win over Billy Rhodes and Tyler Ollendieck. It was an all Murty front row in the IMCA Sunoco Stock Car main event. The elder of the two, Da­mon Murty fought off the challenges of his son Dallon early before Steve Meyer snuck between the two. Damon went on to get to the checkers first ahead of Meyer and Dallon Murty.   Jeff Aikey took the opening night IMCA Sunoco Late Model feature win and took home the $250 Sunoco Race Fuels bonus given Saturday at Independence Motor Speedway. (IMCA Photo) Tony Olson shot to the high side on the very fast track in the Karl Kustoms Northern SportMod main from his second row start and took the lead from pace setter Kip Siems. Olson scored the opening night win ahead of Jayden Schmidt, who made the long tow from Seymour, WI. Siems rounded out the top three on opening night.   Aikey also sat on the pole for the IMCA Modified main event, but Troy Cordes had his 71C ma­chine dialed in, raced from a third row start and overtook Aikey and cruised on to the win ahead of Jordan Hicks and Darin Duffy.  last_img read more

Q&A with Eric Ladin, actor

first_imgDT: What is one of the toughest parts of being an actor that gets hidden by the glamour?Ladin: It’s a very uncertain lifestyle. You hope to be busy and working on great projects, but it can be a very unstable lifestyle and that’s not always the case. Usually once the momentum gets going though, you can ride that and continue to do great work, and great projects continue to come along. DT: What was it like working on such an immersive miniseries as Generation Kill?Ladin: It was an incredible experience, and one that will probably never be matched in my career. I spent seven months in Africa with 30 guys, all of whom I’ve become very good friends with. We really did start to get the sense of being away — not that we could ever think that we were really in the military, but it was a little bit of life imitating art in the sense that we had left our loved ones at home for seven months and spent all day in a Humvee. Once we started rolling, we had no choice but to start talking and acting like soldiers. DT: Did you always feel like you wanted to be an actor?Ladin: It’s something I’ve always wanted to do, and then I finally started embracing theatre when I was in junior high and really started focusing on it in high school. Then I decided to go to USC, and I made that decision not only because of the theatre program but also because it was in L.A. and I wanted to have that opportunity to possibly start working while I was still in school. DT: How did your education at USC help you in your career?Ladin:  The teachers at USC provided a great service and an amazing classroom experience. I was able to hone my craft and trim the fat off my work, so to speak, so that once I started to get into the real world I was a lot more prepared than I would have been had I started trying to work professionally right out of high school. Los Angeles is home to countless aspiring actors with dreams of making it big. For USC alumnus Eric Ladin, who graduated in 2001 with a bachelor’s degree in theatre, his dream is starting to look like reality. Ladin co-stars in a new AMC original series, The Killing, set to debut April 3. He has also had roles in HBO’s Generation Kill and Big Love, AMC’s Mad Men and several other shows. The Daily Trojan spoke with Ladin in a phone interview.Experienced · Eric Ladin will star in a new AMC original series. – Courtesy of Joan Allen Photography center_img Daily Trojan: When did you feel like you had first broken out as an actor?Eric Ladin: The first role that I felt like I started establishing my foothold was Generation Kill, because I had been kind of bouncing around and doing a lot of guest star work before that. After Generation Kill, more high-caliber work started to come consistently, and I haven’t really slowed down since. DT: What are some of your best memories of college?Ladin: In terms of acting it was getting to do Grease, the musical, mainly because of the people that were in it. Kelly Ward directed it, and he had been in the movie, so he knew it well, and we had a ball doing it. On the non-acting side of it, one of my best experiences at USC — and I probably can’t get arrested for this now — was when we took a go-kart from a science fair one day, drove it around campus and hid it in a parking garage. Traddies probably contributed to that. DT: What is one piece of advice you want to pass on to current students?Ladin:  The piece of advice that I got that meant the most to me was to really enjoy all four years and love every moment of it. As an actor, you play so many different roles throughout your career, and the only way to tap into those roles is through the experiences you’ve lived, and so many of those come from my four years at USC. Do as many shows as you can, go to as many parties as you can, meet as many people as you can and steal as many go-karts as you can.last_img read more