Tool’s First New Album Since 2006 Is Recorded And Being Mixed, Says Maynard James Keenan

first_imgOver the past few years, news about a new Tool album—what would be their first LP since 2006’s 10,000 Days—has periodically made its way through the Internet grapevine. Now, according to a Friday tweet from frontman Maynard James Keenan, it appears that the elusive new Tool record is close to completion. As Keenan notes, the vocals are tracked, and they are now in the process of mixing the album. You can see the tweet below: At times discouraging, at other times encouraging, progress on the new Tool release has been inching along for some time. Plans became more concrete when Keenan revealed plans last year to reunite with his bandmates in the studio to record music he’d been working on. At that point in February of 2018, he had finished writing the words and melodies to all but one of the new tracks, according to Consequence of Sound. Then, guitarist Adam Jones chimed in that recording of the new album would happen in March.As March 2018 went on, Jones posted a short video clip from a studio on Instagram with the caption, “Day 1.” Later, Jones posted a photo that confirms audio engineer “Immortan Evil Joe Barresi,” who mixed Tool’s 10,000 Days, as the man behind the console for the recording session. Marking the first new music since that 2006 album, Jones joked in the post: “Our first choice was Phil Spector – but he has other conflicting work obligations.”Tool has also been announced on a number of festival lineups for 2019. For a full list of upcoming Tool dates, head to their website here.With Keenan’s new update, we’re feeling pretty confident about the prospect of new Tool in 2019.[H/T AV Club]last_img read more

Expert says late antiviral treatment may still help H5N1 patients

first_imgDec 12, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – A virologist who has treated H5N1 avian influenza patients in Vietnam said the antiviral drug oseltamivir may help avian flu patients even when started later than 2 days after illness onset—generally considered too late, according to a Reuters report today.The standard advice about oseltamivir for treatment of seasonal flu is that it can shorten the illness if it is started within 2 days after the first symptoms. But Menno de Jong of the Hospital for Tropical Diseases in Ho Chi Minh City said the drug seemed to help four of his patients even though it was started later.De Jong said the assumption that oseltamivir works only if started within 48 hours may be true only for human flu viruses. He said the H5N1 virus is known to continue replicating in humans on the seventh or eighth day of symptoms.”In my experience, there is a clear suggestion that there was still virus replication [when we made] a late start in treatment,” de Jong told Reuters at a conference in Singapore. “In four of my patients, there was very rapid clearance of the virus from the throat and all four survived.”De Jong told the conference audience, “If you can decrease the viral load [with drugs], you can have a good outcome. Even those who are treated late had good results.”But the report didn’t mention any other evidence that late treatment can work, besides de Jong’s anecdotal findings in a few of his own patients.De Jong, who treated 17 H5N1 patients in 2004 and 2005, of whom 12 died, agreed with other experts that starting treatment early is still best, Reuters reported.The United States and many other countries have been stockpiling oseltamivir in the face of the risk that avian flu will spark a pandemic. No one knows how effective the drug will be if the virus evolves into a pandemic strain.The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends oseltamivir as first-line treatment for H5N1 avian flu (with zanamivir [Relenza] as the second choice). The WHO guidelines do not say that treatment must be started within the first 2 days of illness to be effective.The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says oseltamivir and zanamivir have been shown to reduce the duration of seasonal flu by about 1 day, provided treatment is begun within 48 hours of the first symptoms.See also: WHO guidelines on pharmacologic management of patients infected with H5N1http://whqlibdoc.who.int/hq/2006/WHO_PSM_PAR_2006.6_eng.pdflast_img read more

Rodger Davis has finally sold his European-style home after a decade long stint on the market

first_img89 Skyline Terrace Burleigh HeadsIT has been nearly a decade since Australian Open champion Rodger Davis listed his Burleigh Heads trophy home, but it has finally sold for a multi-million dollar figure this week. 89 Skyline Terrace Burleigh Heads finally sold after a decade long stint on the marketMore from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North7 hours ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa1 day agoThe former world top-10 golfer bought the home at 89 Skyline Terrace for $2.25 million in 2006 and took it on and off the market for nine years. Black Label Property Broadbeach agent Andrew Ramsey was marketing the property for offers above $2.1 million. 89 Skyline Terrace Burleigh HeadsIn 2013 the property went to auction where it failed to sell and until recently it was rented out for $1300 per week. Set on 1144sq m with views to Surfers Paradise, the four-bedroom Mediterranean-inspired home has a gourmet kitchen, wine cellar and pool. center_img 89 Skyline Tce, Burleigh Heads.he home was built by developer Larry Lazarides who lived in it until he sold to Davis’. Parquetry floors and timber window frames feature throughout the home which has views out to Surfers Paradise. Davis had a long career in professional golf and featured at The Masters, US Open and The British Open, where he finished runner-up in 1987.last_img read more

INDOT plans ADA meeting in Seymour

first_imgSeymour, In. — The advisory group and the public will have the opportunity to provide information and recommendations regarding INDOT’s ADA Transition Plan and provide input to INDOT on how to improve accessibility to all INDOT programs and facilities. This includes efforts to increase the public involvement of persons with disabilities in transportation planning.INDOT’s ADA Transition Plan examines current facilities and services for barriers to access for persons with disabilities. INDOT uses this plan to quantify and prioritize changes that will bring its programs and practices into compliance with Title II of the ADA, Section 504 of the Vocational Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and all related statutes, regulations and directives. The current document (being revised and updated for 2018) is available for review in Microsoft Word and PDF format on INDOT’s website under “Accessibility & Non-Discrimination” at http://www.in.gov/indot/3583.htm.In accordance with the “Americans with Disabilities Act”, persons with disabilities requiring assistance and/or accommodation related to the accessibility to project documents and participation at the public hearing venue, are encouraged to contact Rickie Clark, INDOT Office of Public Involvement at (317) 232-6601 [email protected]  Persons of Limited English Proficiency (LEP) requiring accommodation with regard to accessing project information and/or participation at the public hearing are also encouraged to contact the INDOT Office of Public Involvement for additional assistance.  An ASL interpreter will be present to provide in-person ASL interpretation.  Requests for additional auxiliary aides and services are requested to be submitted not later than 10 days prior to the meeting, though INDOT will make every effort to accommodate late requests.Meeting Agenda:Welcome and introduction of the CAWG group and membersVoting to nominate Chairperson of the CAWGDiscussion of a CAWG Board Members Training Session – Summer 2018Discussion of ADA Projects completed 2015-2018Public comments on INDOT’s ADA Transition Plan & Accessibility programs2018 CAWG meeting schedulelast_img read more