USCG Helicopter Medevacs Man from South Korean Icebreaker

first_img View post tag: Navy View post tag: americas August 22, 2014 View post tag: USCG View post tag: asia A US Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter medevaced a crewmember suffering from a head injury from the South Korean research icebreaker Araon 250 miles north of Barrow, Wednesday. View post tag: South Korean Back to overview,Home naval-today USCG Helicopter Medevacs Man from South Korean Icebreaker USCG Helicopter Medevacs Man from South Korean Icebreaker View post tag: Icebreakercenter_img The helicopter crew, forward deployed to Barrow in anticipation of the forward operating location opening on Thursday, safely hoisted the 43-year-old male from the Araon and transported him to emergency medical personnel in Barrow.Coast Guard 17th District command center watchstanders received the medevac request from the crew of the Araon Tuesday afternoon. The icebreaker crew began heading south to get within range of the Jayhawk helicopters in Barrow. Command center watchstanders also contacted the crew of the Coast Guard Cutter Healy, who are engaged in science missions in the Arctic, to support communications with helicopter crews for the flight.Once the Araon closed the distance to land, both Jayhawk helicopter crews at forward operating location Barrow launched to rendezvous with the icebreaker. The aircrews arrived on-scene, safely hoisted the injured man and an accompanying translator, and returned to Barrow.The FOL in Barrow is part of the 17th District’s Arctic Shield 2014, in concurrence with the Coast Guard Arctic Strategy.Weather on scene was reported as 35 degrees, 17 mph winds and heavy fog.[mappress]Press Release, August 22, 2014; Image: USCG View post tag: Medevacs Authorities View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Helicopter View post tag: Naval View post tag: man Share this articlelast_img read more

City Bursars

first_imgAmidst growing speculation over the financial future of British Universities, Oxbridge college bursars have increasingly been looking to the City to consider their investment strategies.Dr. Robert Gasser, Bursar of Brasenose between 1982 and 2001, has arranged a series of roundtable discussion forums for Oxbridge bursars in conjunction with his current firm, Chiswell Associates.He commented that “the financial pressures have concentrated minds”, as it emerged that St. John’s College, Cambridge was facing a deficit of £2.4 million against a projected sharp drop in government funding alongside top-up fee proposals.Archive: oth week HT 2004last_img

Hoornstra: Hall of Fame voting has become a feedback loop

first_img Jose Suarez’s rocky start sinks Angels in loss to Astros We all write things in private that we would never share publicly, like a child secretly passing a folded-up note in class. Baseball’s Hall of Fame ballot is, for some voters, a secret folded-up note. We always discover the note eventually, but we don’t always learn who wrote it. In fact, we learn every year that the authors of some notes want to keep their identities hidden.Of the 397 BBWAA members who returned a ballot this year, all but one checked the box next to Derek Jeter’s name. The dissident has so far remained anonymous. To some fans, the Jeter-less ballot spoke louder than the other 396.Omitting Jeter was hardly a criminal act, let alone an affront to baseball tradition. Only Mariano Rivera has been listed on more than 99.7 percent of all Hall of Fame ballots since the first group was inducted in 1936. And there have been less sensible ballot omissions in history. Joe DiMaggio needed four tries to become a Hall of Famer, Yogi Berra two. Thirty-six voters left Jackie Robinson off their ballot in 1972.Cooperstown has received many taboo ballots and will receive many more in the years to come. The BBWAA has called for total transparency, for an end to secret ballots. Yet the Hall of Fame continues to allow anonymity to the voters who request it. This “private option,” if you will, always leads to interesting results. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Angels’ Shohei Ohtani spending downtime working in outfield I know of at least two voters in the past decade who were ensnared by the trap of giving sincere votes to a player who was named on no other public ballots. (In each case, their player was named on one private ballot.) Since the anonymous voters couldn’t serve as a lightning rod for public criticism, guess who did? Those two voters haven’t cast a public ballot since.The BBWAA has pushed for transparency. Although I am a BBWAA member, I am two years short of receiving my first Hall of Fame ballot. There’s time for my perspective on this to evolve. In lieu of any first-hand experience, I can offer an observation: Hall of Fame voting has become a feedback loop.There’s a reason the social media era gave birth to the first unanimous ballot. It’s the same reason the ballots missing Jeter, and those including Ibañez, Dunn, Penny and Putz, remain anonymous. The power of the secret ballot lies in the diversity of thought it promotes.You can turn to the politics section of this newspaper and see the same phenomenon play out on its pages. When it comes to Hall of Fame voting, ostracizing the dissidents seems less consequential. Then as now, however, the three dozen voters who stiffed Jackie Robinson have some explaining to do. Dunn broke in with the Reds in 2000 and bounced around to the Diamondbacks, Nationals, White Sox and A’s during a 14-year career. He was a curious player by the standards of his day, combining a high on-base percentage with lots of home runs and even more strikeouts. (Dunn led his league in K’s four times.) By contemporary standards, however, his skill set is downright common.Add it up, and these four players have six All-Star Game appearances among them. None won an MVP award, or a Cy Young, or was named Rookie of the Year. In 59 combined seasons, the quartet has garnered fewer accolades than Justin Verlander.If social media wasn’t made for disseminating information, it was made for backlash. Tuesday turned Baseball Twitter into one big comment section for the Jeter-less ballot. The commentary overshadowed the usual vitriol reserved for the one-vote down-ballot darlings du jour. It’s not by coincidence that the Ibañez/Dunn/Penny/Putz voters haven’t outed themselves. They don’t need to read the comments section to know what’s coming. Who would voluntarily raise their hand and direct faux outrage toward him or herself?Related Articlescenter_img Harvard-Westlake alum Lucas Giolito throws no-hitter for White Sox The ballots that fascinate me most are not those that omit Jeter, Robinson, Berra or DiMaggio. I’m more interested in ballots with checkmarks next to names such as Adam Dunn, Brad Penny, J.J. Putz, and Raul Ibañez. It’s a slightly more consequential version of the “Remember Some Guys” bit.Dunn, Penny, Putz and Ibañez each received a single, anonymous vote this year.Ibañez, a left fielder for the Mariners, Royals, Phillies, Yankees and Angels from 1996-2014, never led his league in a major hitting category. He made one All-Star team.Putz was a closer for 4-1/2 of his 11 full major-league seasons. He retired with 189 career saves, one All-Star Game appearance, and no black ink on his resume.Penny had his best years with the Dodgers, leading the NL in wins in 2006. He won 121 games before retiring with the Marlins in 2014, 14 years after his debut. Dodgers’ Will Smith: ‘I feel like it’s been five years’ since his 2019 debut Angels offense breaks out to split doubleheader with Astros last_img read more