Habitat for Humanity and Home Depot build affordable homes for El Cajon

first_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsHabitat for Humanity says their mission is to bring people together by building homes, communities and hope.On Wednesday, that mission became possible through a partnership with the Home Depot.KUSI’s Ginger Jeffries was LIVE with the story. Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Ginger Jeffries Posted: June 13, 2018 Ginger Jeffries, Habitat for Humanity and Home Depot build affordable homes for El Cajon families June 13, 2018last_img read more

Investigation into fetuses found at harbor treatment plant called off

first_img SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Police announced Friday that they have halted an investigation into the discovery of the remains of unborn twins found at a wastewater-treatment plant near San Diego Bay because the fetuses were not at a viable stage of development.Investigators were still concerned that the mother of the fetuses, which were discovered Thursday at the treatment plant on Harbor Drive, could be in need of medical attention, San Diego police Lt. Matt Dobbs said.“This is obviously a very difficult time and the investigators hope these developments will give the mother the confidence to seek whatever medical or emotional assistance she may need,” he said.Homicide detectives were assigned to investigate, but the probe was called off after it was determined that the fetuses “were not of a viable stage of development,” Dobbs said.“Incidents like these are thankfully rare, but nonetheless tragic for everyone involved,” the lieutenant said. “The San Diego Police Department would like to remind everyone of the safe-surrender law, which allows for the anonymous surrender of a newborn to any emergency room or fire station to avoid babies from being hurt or killed due to abandonment.”Information about the state statute can be found on the city of San Diego website.___A pair of human fetuses — the remains of unborn twins — were found today at a wastewater-treatment plant near San Diego Bay.The developmental stage of the fetuses discovered at the utility facility on Harbor Drive, how they got there and the identity of the mother were unknown, according to San Diego police officials, who assigned homicide detectives to investigate due to the nature of the case.“The investigation is in the very early stages at this time, and the circumstances surrounding the tragic death of the fetuses are unknown,” Lt. Matt Dobbs said this afternoon. “Of primary concern at this time is the welfare of the mother. The investigators are concerned the mother may have experienced some type of medical distress during the birthing process.”The county Medical Examiner’s Office will seek to determine the age of the fetuses and how they died. Dobbs described the case as unusual.“Incidents like these are thankfully rare, but nonetheless tragic for everyone involved,” he said. “The San Diego Police Department would like to remind everyone of the safe-surrender law, which allows for the anonymous surrender of a newborn to any emergency room or fire station to avoid babies from being hurt or killed due to abandonment.” April 18, 2019 KUSI Newsroom Investigation into fetuses found at harbor treatment plant called off KUSI Newsroom, center_img Updated: 12:06 PM Posted: April 18, 2019 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

Initiative to tackle noncommunicable diseases in Asia

first_imgUnderstanding the urgent need for Asian countries to look at non-communicable diseases seriously, Vietnam National Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology (NHE) in association with International Development Research Centre (IDRC) has organised a workshop on ‘Tackling diet-related non-communicable diseases in Asia: A regional approach to improve response capacities.’ The workshop which started on November 19, will go on until November 22 at Hanoi, Vietnam. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfIn a first-ever training workshop, researchers and policy makers from over 10 countries will draw up an action plan to tackle diet-related NCDs through a contextual understanding of regional challenges. Participants include researchers and policymakers from China, Mongolia, Southeast, and South Asia, namely, SriLanka, India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Vietnam, Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, Cambodia, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, and Malaysia. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThe workshop training will cater to pre-defined needs of each country participant as they highlight their experiences related to the challenges of improving food environments via research/interventions and advocacy/policy influence. Throughout the training activities, participants will work together to develop and refine new and existing multi-country research proposals aimed at improving food environments. Developing countries, which include low and middle income (LMIC) nations are battling a double burden of disease. On one hand, they are fighting infectious diseases such as AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria and on the other, losing an alarmingly high number of lives to non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, mental illness, and diabetes. Of even more concern is the fact that NCD risks associated with diet are increasing in younger age groups. NCDs pose long-term economic burdens on society directly through acute and long-term morbidity management and indirectly through impaired capacities. Despite the loss of human life, productivity and crippling of resources, the generation of regional research has been limited in LMICs with most of the evidence-based research being derived from high-income countries. There is, therefore, need for greater research in the broader Asian region to understand contextual drivers of rising NCD trends to develop appropriate and sustainable interventions.last_img read more