Ancelotti: Lewy jibes not important

first_imgBayern München Bayern boss Ancelotti moving on from Lewandowski controversy Dom Farrell Last updated 2 years ago 22:51 11/9/2017 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) RobertLewandowski - cropped Bongarts Bayern München Robert Lewandowski Bayern München v Anderlecht Anderlecht UEFA Champions League Carlo Ancelotti Robert Lewandowski earned a dressing down from Karl-Heinz Rummenigge but Bayern boss Carlo Ancelotti is focused on beating Anderlecht. Carlo Ancelotti moved to draw a line under Robert Lewandowski’s controversial criticism of the Bayern Munich squad ahead of Tuesday’s Champions League Group B opener against Anderlecht.Lewandowski questioned Bayern’s transfer policy during the recent window as they failed to match the spiralling spending levels of Paris Saint-Germain, Barcelona and Manchester City.Bayern 13/2 for CL title with dabblebet Article continues below Editors’ Picks ‘I’m getting better’ – Can Man Utd flop Fred save his Old Trafford career? Why Barcelona god Messi will never be worshipped in the same way in Argentina Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Bayern chief executive Karl-Heinz Rummenigge was critical of Lewandowski and his agent, questioning the player’s loyalty, while former midfielder Stefan Effenberg invited him to chase a move to PSG or Barca if he so desired.As such, Ancelotti did not see the need to wade further into the debate as he plots a recovery from Saturday’s surprise 2-0 loss at Hoffenheim.”I don’t have to speak with Lewandowski about the interview that he made,” he told a pre-match news conference.”I have to speak to him about the chances that he has to use tomorrow. This is the most important thing.”[email protected]: “@rscanderlecht are a good side, well organised. As always, we have to be cautious in our #UCL opener.” #FCBRSCA pic.twitter.com/oY28bi5hrL— FC Bayern English (@FCBayernEN) September 11, 2017Bayern broke the Bundesliga transfer record to sign Corentin Tolisso from Lyon for €41million in June and also secured Real Madrid playmaker James Rodriguez on a two-year loan, along with Hoffenheim due Sebastian Rudy and Niklas Sule.Contrary to Lewandowski’s doubts over Bayern’s business, Ancelotti believes his current crop have the capacity to improve upon last season’s Bundesliga title – their fifth in succession – and Champions League quarter-final appearance.”In this period, we are not better than last year because last year, in the second half of last season, we were really good,” he said.”We can be better of course, making the new players more comfortable because I think that the new players who have arrived have improved the quality of the squad.”We need time. We are not at the same level at this period but with time we can be better.”Ancelotti added: “We tried to buy new players to improve the quality and I think after one or two months the players give me the confidence we can be better than last season.”I do not want to compare to the seasons before because there was another manager and that is not correct. There are players with really good quality.”last_img read more

Nova Scotia capital commemorates catastrophic Halifax Explosion 100 years ago

first_imgHALIFAX – Rose Poirier stood on a hill overlooking Halifax harbour at 9:04 a.m. Wednesday, quietly marking the moment precisely 100 years before when the city’s bustling north end was obliterated by the worst human-caused disaster in Canadian history.Before the poets and the politicians spoke at a ceremony marking the grim centennial, Poirier recalled a harrowing story from a 106-year-old relative who miraculously survived the Halifax Explosion and still lives in the city’s west end.Poirier said her husband’s great aunt, Halifax resident Hazel Forrest, was staying with her sister in a home on Bilby Street on Dec. 6, 1917, when two wartime ships collided in the harbour, sparking a massive explosion that killed almost 2,000 people, wounded 9,000 and left 25,000 homeless.It was the world’s largest human-made blast until an atomic bomb was detonated in 1945.As a white-hot shock wave rolled up from the harbour, razing much of the city’s north end, six-year-old Hazel was hurled through a crumbling wall.“She remembers being thrown down from an upper floor into her uncle’s arms because the wall and the stairs had been blown off,” Poirier said Wednesday as a steady downpour pelted the hundreds of onlookers who gathered for a commemorative service at Fort Needham Memorial Park — not far from what was ground zero in 1917.“Her sister Evelyn had been bathing their baby brother, and she was thrown down the cellar stairs. The baby was scalded because they were near the stove. They found that baby across the street.”Forrest, one of the oldest survivors of the explosion, now lives in a nursing home and was unable to attend the ceremony because of blustery weather.Halifax Mayor Mike Savage told the crowd it’s the heart-rending stories of individual Haligonians that help Canadians understand an otherwise incomprehensible tragedy.To make his point, Savage singled out the Jackson family, represented by several relatives in the crowd, which lost more than 40 members to the explosion and ensuing conflagration.“To whomever you seek comfort from, to whomever you pray to in the evening … when you close your eyes tonight, ask for a blessing for those who lived 100 years ago — for those who were killed, for those who survived and to those who rebuilt,” the mayor said as gusts of wind blew the rain sideways.“We say to them what we say to our great military heroes on Remembrance Day: ‘We will remember them.’”In a heated tent near the park’s Halifax Explosion Memorial Bell Tower, 82-year-old Gerald Edward Jackson recalled how his father was trapped in the rubble of a house for three days before a searcher with a dog found him.“He was blown down into the basement of the house and the house caved in on top of him, and it was burning,” he said as family members leaned in to hear the story. “It was a chaotic thing … My dad never spoke about the explosion at all.”As the ceremony began at 9:04 a.m. — the exact time of the blast — a cannon was fired at the Halifax Citadel National Historic Site, and ships in the harbour sounded their horns, the mournful wail echoing across the city as the crowd observed a moment of silence.Halifax’s poet laureate, Rebecca Thomas, said most historical accounts of the explosion fail to recognize the shabby way the city’s black and Indigenous populations were treated after the disaster.“Nostalgia can sometimes be toxic and … many voices often disappear into the past without ever being heard,” she told the crowd.African Nova Scotians living in the Africville neighbourhood, which was severely damaged by the explosion, were given only a fraction of the rebuilding funds offered to white Haligonians, she said. As for Turtle Grove, a Mi’kmaq village on the Dartmouth side of the harbour, it was wiped out by a tsunami created by the blast.“Those who survived were segregated and kept out of the hospitals,” Thomas said.George Elliott Clarke, the Nova Scotia-born parliamentary poet laureate, recited a poem recalling the poignant moments leading up to the deadly detonation, including the imagined last goodbyes of children as they went off to school in the city’s Richmond neighbourhood.“Punctual salutations resonate in Richmond homes as spouses trudge to factory or menial jobs. Children troop to school and many of those cheery, kissed-cheek goodbyes will prove unknowingly final,” he said, reading from a soaked page.Clarke also remembered Vincent Coleman, the telegraph dispatcher who, “alert and alarmed, tapped out urgent, percussive Morse (code)” to warn an incoming train to stop before he died in the explosion.Coleman’s grandson, Calgary lawyer Jim Coleman, also spoke at the ceremony, recalling how earlier generations refused to talk about what happened.After 100 years, that is changing, he said, adding that his grandfather’s legacy as a hero should never be forgotten.“He had a choice. He had a choice to stay or a choice to leave and try to save his life. We believe he made the right choice. He stayed and for that many people lived,” he said.Note to readers: This is a corrected story. An earlier version wrongly stated the Halifax Explosion was the largest artificial blast prior to the bombing of Hiroshima.last_img read more

AN OPEN LETTER TO ACTORS OF COLOR FROM AN ACTOR OF COLOR

first_imgAdvertisement Facebook Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: Advertisement But being an actor of color has by no way hindered my success in the commercial, theatre, film and television industries. Quite the opposite – it has propelled it.Though my acting career has been brief in comparison to some of my peers, I have been able to monetize my creativity and make acting a sustainable way of living. In the past year alone I have booked 4 Feature Films, 3 TV Pilots, 3 Web Series, 2 Professional Theatre contracts, and so many commercials I’ve lost count.This is not to “toot my own horn” by any means – but I am a busy working actor. My agent…she’s happy. It’s something every actress & actor strives for, and I don’t fully agree with the sentiments of some of my peers that the industry consistently conspires against us.Numerous times I’ve seen in social media groups, some of which are geared towards providing casting notices specifically to actresses & actors of color, people complaining about the lack of breakdowns for performers of color or specificity therein. I’ve seen the latest statistics on representation on screen and I understand that certain things do still have to catch up in terms of on screen representation in relation to proportion of the population (which I think is the fairest measure). But in fact when you read the reports, the trends are looking favorable for this, and in some cases representation meets or exceeds that of the proportion of population (more so when the total cast is taken as a whole and in television – leads still seem to be disproportionately white by the reports I’ve read that take the US population in account).Now I’m not here to argue the intricate details of that at the moment, though I understand that’s often that’s were the devil resides. It’s definitely a conversation we must have. What I’m suggesting is that we are moving past the tipping point of change in the industry in terms of opportunity, and that this is a great time for us actors & actresses of color. So let’s move forward with a more nuanced narrative that acknowledges this.I have never seen so many stars of varying ethnic backgrounds. From Dwayne Johnson to Danai Gurira, you only need to turn on your television and open your eyes to see the plethora of different people. Audiences want to see diverse casts and change has happened and continues to do so. This is the entertainment business after all – emphasis on business – and you don’t think that great financial successes like Black Panther have had an impact on casting considerations? Or that even older successes like Rush Hour didn’t catch attention? You really don’t think that those executives haven’t taken a long, hard look at demographic proportions and projections domestically and worldwide, and factored in the marketing benefits of having a diverse cast? Who their audience is and will be? Audiences are diverse and ultimately pay the bills of those who produce content. It only makes sense from a business standpoint.It doesn’t seem to me that there exists a “racist conspiracy” that intends to keep us down. If the system was so inherently oppressive, how else would a person such as myself be able to be thriving in what is arguably the most competitive market in the world? In addition, I’ve performed in (paid) productions that have covered stories based internationally from Afghanistan to St Lucia. Sure, call me an Uncle Tom if you like – but in my experience thus far, I have overwhelmingly received support in my career.CD’s from Mann, to Jules, Powerhouse, Jigsaw, Larissa Mair Casting, The Casting Group, Brunch Store and numerous independent and major production companies (just to name a few) – have all brought me in. And multiple times at that. I’ve competed for roles against white counterparts and I’ve gotten them. These decision makers are behind us, they pitch us to their clients and they fight for us.To them I have nothing to give but thanks – and I don’t think that we do that enough.The fact is is that success is now based more on personal merit and strategy then I think some would like to admit, and for performers of color it’s been bolstered by the increased marketability of diversity. The industry at large is not void of its fair share of superficiality and “looks” matter too of course, but our “look” is in demand and growing.Every single up and coming performer of color I’ve been following or worked with – works hard. Myself included. And every up and coming white performer I’ve seen that continues to remain viable – works hard. So what’s the common denominator? Work Hard. Be persistent. Embody change through your own excellency. It really does pay off with the application of gumption and strategic decision making.For us performers of color, the odds are becoming increasingly stacked in our favor. In my opinion, it’s easy to play the blame game rather than strap on your boots and hit the pavement. We didn’t choose an easy industry, it’s a difficult one all things considered. And when you insightfully take into account the totality of your experiences in this acting game and the opportunities that present themselves – the work is there for the taking.Besides, isn’t that what we want to be known for?by TARICK GLANCYCLICK HERE TO CHECK OUT OUR INTERVIEW WITH TARICK GLANCYFOLLOW TARICK ON SOCIAL MEDIA & WEBSITE:Facebook: https://facebook.com/tarick.glancyTwitter: https://www.twitter.com/thisbepuddyInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/thisbepuddyWebsite: : https://www.tarickglancy.com/IMDB: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm8401430/ I am an actor of color.Well, partially if you want to get technical. My father is Canadian (pretty much as white as they can get) and my mom was born in Guyana. According to industry terms that all actors, directors and producers will be familiar with, the best way to describe my look is “ethnically ambiguous”. In daily life I am seen as “ethnic” of various sorts, or mixed – which I am.In fact what “seems to be” versus “what is” can be applied to my chosen career field to greater and greater degrees. Twitterlast_img read more