13 new COVID-19 cases reported locally

first_imgStatewide — The Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) has reported that 755 additional Hoosiers have been diagnosed with COVID-19 on Monday. A total of 106,540 Indiana residents have tested positive for the coronavirus. To date, 1,247,293 individual tests have been reported to ISDH at an 8.5% positive rate and 2 new deaths were reported for a total of 3,215 Hoosier deaths.Dearborn County has a total of 608 cases and 28 deaths reported (up 6 new cases), Decatur County has a total of 446 positive cases and 38 deaths (up 4 new cases), Franklin County has 288 positive cases and 25 deaths (up 1 new case), and Ripley County has 267 positive cases and 8 deaths (up 2 new cases). Locally, this is an increase of 13 new positive cases.last_img

USC’s best teams are still under the radar

first_imgWater polo is a sport I had never watched until last August. Lacrosse is something I had never seen in person until March. These two teams are currently dominating the nation. USC’s women’s water polo and women’s lacrosse team are a combined 35-0 this year.Despite their success, these sports are flying under the radar. Their success comes during a school year in which the football team had another tumultuous year that ended with mixed emotions — the hiring of head coach Clay Helton to go along with a great victory over UCLA that won the Pac-12 South for the Trojans before falling in the championship game to an underrated Stanford team and a season-ending loss in the Holiday Bowl.USC basketball was relevant for the first time in ages, winning 21 games, beating UCLA three times and earning a spot to the NCAA tournament where they lost in the first round.Those will be the storylines from this year that will be remembered even though there are other athletes who are equally deserving of attention and praise, if not more so given their record of success.Fans should be watching these teams compete. I am one of the fans to blame as well. As previously mentioned, I hadn’t watched either sport until this year, but I can assure you, even someone who knows nothing of either sport will be entertained.The competitive spirit and drive to greatness of these athletes is something to behold, and to have two programs dominating the competition at the same time is incredible.Women’s water polo is No. 1 in the country and has been for several weeks. Women’s lacrosse has been steadily climbing up the rankings and has now broken into the top five.The sports should be celebrated regardless of the outcome of the rest of their season as we celebrated a football and basketball team who had less dominating regular seasons and subpar postseasons. The lacrosse and water polo teams have the opportunity to do something special and cap potentially undefeated seasons with conference and national titles.Should the water polo team put themselves in a position to end an undefeated season with a national championship, it would be the fourth for the team under the guidance of head coach Jovan Vavic who has also led the men’s team to nine national titles. Entering this season, the water polo team has played in the NCAA tournament 12 straight seasons and finished in third for the second straight year. Prior to that in 2013, the Women of Troy won it all.The success of this program is well documented and should not come as a surprise to anyone, but this season has the potential to be one for the record books should the team finish their regular season on Friday without losing a game all year. The team is currently 20-0 and a win against Cal on Friday would put them at 21 wins — the same number as the men’s basketball team put up. The NCAA tournament is approaching soon after in May.For the lacrosse team — a program in just its fourth year since its inception — the road to success is much shorter. After making their first NCAA tournament appearance last year and losing to perennial powerhouse Duke, the Women of Troy came back with a vengeance this season that has included avenging their previous loss to the Blue Devils.As the Women of Troy have blazed through MPSF play, consistently putting up double-digit scores, critics could have said that the competition was below them and they should have been beating these teams. The Trojans 14th and 15th wins of the year came recently against the No. 12 and No. 6 team in the country.The lacrosse team has similarly not dropped a game this season and is poised to have a legitimate shot at taking home a national title.The harsh reality of the situation is however, if these teams fail to win it all, their masterful seasons will most likely be forgotten. Even if they do win the national title, there won’t be nearly the celebration that would have occurred had the football or basketball team gotten just as close.Part of the reason is the school calendar in saying that the tournaments for lacrosse and water polo are just not as convenient for students to keep up with as March Madness or the College Football Playoff, and while that is certainly true to an extent, the fact of the matter is that the sports are just not as popular.While they deserve credit and accolades to be poured upon them, there isn’t the same buzz surrounding these programs as there should be. It remains to be seen what the final storyline will be for these programs, but surely a dedicated slice of students will be paying attention regardless of what happens.As Trojans, aren’t we all in the pursuit of perfection? We should be celebrating the athletes that have come the closest to achieving it.Hailey Tucker is a sophomore majoring in broadcast and digital journalism. She is also the sports editor of the Daily Trojan. Her column, “Tucker Talks,” runs every other Wednesday.last_img read more

Hoornstra: Hall of Fame voting has become a feedback loop

first_img Jose Suarez’s rocky start sinks Angels in loss to Astros We all write things in private that we would never share publicly, like a child secretly passing a folded-up note in class. Baseball’s Hall of Fame ballot is, for some voters, a secret folded-up note. We always discover the note eventually, but we don’t always learn who wrote it. In fact, we learn every year that the authors of some notes want to keep their identities hidden.Of the 397 BBWAA members who returned a ballot this year, all but one checked the box next to Derek Jeter’s name. The dissident has so far remained anonymous. To some fans, the Jeter-less ballot spoke louder than the other 396.Omitting Jeter was hardly a criminal act, let alone an affront to baseball tradition. Only Mariano Rivera has been listed on more than 99.7 percent of all Hall of Fame ballots since the first group was inducted in 1936. And there have been less sensible ballot omissions in history. Joe DiMaggio needed four tries to become a Hall of Famer, Yogi Berra two. Thirty-six voters left Jackie Robinson off their ballot in 1972.Cooperstown has received many taboo ballots and will receive many more in the years to come. The BBWAA has called for total transparency, for an end to secret ballots. Yet the Hall of Fame continues to allow anonymity to the voters who request it. This “private option,” if you will, always leads to interesting results. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Angels’ Shohei Ohtani spending downtime working in outfield I know of at least two voters in the past decade who were ensnared by the trap of giving sincere votes to a player who was named on no other public ballots. (In each case, their player was named on one private ballot.) Since the anonymous voters couldn’t serve as a lightning rod for public criticism, guess who did? Those two voters haven’t cast a public ballot since.The BBWAA has pushed for transparency. Although I am a BBWAA member, I am two years short of receiving my first Hall of Fame ballot. There’s time for my perspective on this to evolve. In lieu of any first-hand experience, I can offer an observation: Hall of Fame voting has become a feedback loop.There’s a reason the social media era gave birth to the first unanimous ballot. It’s the same reason the ballots missing Jeter, and those including Ibañez, Dunn, Penny and Putz, remain anonymous. The power of the secret ballot lies in the diversity of thought it promotes.You can turn to the politics section of this newspaper and see the same phenomenon play out on its pages. When it comes to Hall of Fame voting, ostracizing the dissidents seems less consequential. Then as now, however, the three dozen voters who stiffed Jackie Robinson have some explaining to do. Dunn broke in with the Reds in 2000 and bounced around to the Diamondbacks, Nationals, White Sox and A’s during a 14-year career. He was a curious player by the standards of his day, combining a high on-base percentage with lots of home runs and even more strikeouts. (Dunn led his league in K’s four times.) By contemporary standards, however, his skill set is downright common.Add it up, and these four players have six All-Star Game appearances among them. None won an MVP award, or a Cy Young, or was named Rookie of the Year. In 59 combined seasons, the quartet has garnered fewer accolades than Justin Verlander.If social media wasn’t made for disseminating information, it was made for backlash. Tuesday turned Baseball Twitter into one big comment section for the Jeter-less ballot. The commentary overshadowed the usual vitriol reserved for the one-vote down-ballot darlings du jour. It’s not by coincidence that the Ibañez/Dunn/Penny/Putz voters haven’t outed themselves. They don’t need to read the comments section to know what’s coming. Who would voluntarily raise their hand and direct faux outrage toward him or herself?Related Articlescenter_img Harvard-Westlake alum Lucas Giolito throws no-hitter for White Sox The ballots that fascinate me most are not those that omit Jeter, Robinson, Berra or DiMaggio. I’m more interested in ballots with checkmarks next to names such as Adam Dunn, Brad Penny, J.J. Putz, and Raul Ibañez. It’s a slightly more consequential version of the “Remember Some Guys” bit.Dunn, Penny, Putz and Ibañez each received a single, anonymous vote this year.Ibañez, a left fielder for the Mariners, Royals, Phillies, Yankees and Angels from 1996-2014, never led his league in a major hitting category. He made one All-Star team.Putz was a closer for 4-1/2 of his 11 full major-league seasons. He retired with 189 career saves, one All-Star Game appearance, and no black ink on his resume.Penny had his best years with the Dodgers, leading the NL in wins in 2006. He won 121 games before retiring with the Marlins in 2014, 14 years after his debut. Dodgers’ Will Smith: ‘I feel like it’s been five years’ since his 2019 debut Angels offense breaks out to split doubleheader with Astros last_img read more