The Latest: SEC football players to be tested twice a week

first_img Associated Press The league on Friday released its initial COVID-19 requirements for fall sports, including football. In football, the testing will typically come six days and three days before competition.Coaches, staff and other personnel will be required to wear face coverings on the sidelines at sporting events this fall.The initial guidelines include testing requirements, procedures for infections and contact tracing and protocols for quarantine and isolation. The rules, which also apply to volleyball and soccer, were recommended by the SEC’s Return to Activity and Medical Guidance Task Force.The league expects the task force to release another report by Aug. 31. August 7, 2020 ___What did cricket fans do when there was no live games to watch during lockdown in the coronavirus pandemic?Watched replays. Lots of replays.The International Cricket Council released figures Friday showing it had 1.65 billion video views on its Facebook channel in the first half of 2020, saying it “topped the rankings in terms of video consumption among leading sports bodies” on the social media platform.Cricket was shuttered globally from late March until last month, when host England beat West Indies 2-1 in a three-test series that was played inside bio-secure venues in Southampton and Manchester. Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditThe Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world:___The Southeastern Conference will require football players and others in direct contact with the program to be tested at least twice weekly during the season. The ICC, citing statistics from the CrowdTangle analytics tool, said daily video consumption on its Facebook page increased from 3 million minutes viewed to 15 million minutes per day during the lockdown.“At a time when COVID-19 has severely impacted live sports, the ICC’s channels have gone from strength to strength,” the ICC said in a statement.Cricket hit some highs in terms of viewership over the 12 months to June, including the 1.1 billion views for the Women’s Twenty20 World Cup in Australia in February and March.Online traffic from India helped. The final between Australia and India, which attracted a crowd of more than 86,000 at the Melbourne Cricket Ground, set a single-day record for women’s tournament with 64.9 million views on the ICC Facebook page.___ ___The Detroit Lions are preparing to host fans at all eight regular-season home games, although it’s uncertain how many will be allowed to attend.The NFL club said Friday season-ticket holders can opt out of purchasing tickets for the 2020 season if they want. The team also is offering various incentives for fans who defer payments to the 2021 season instead of asking for refunds.Fans and employees at Ford Field would be required to wear face coverings. Designated gates and entry times would be assigned to fans.The team says the ability to host fans at a reduced capacity depends on local and state approval. The Latest: SEC football players to be tested twice a week More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sportslast_img read more

Syracuse edges Colgate, 1-0, in Nicky Adams’ head coaching debut

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ A flick-on by Syracuse’s Kailee Coonan in the midfield sent Sydney Brackett between two Colgate defenders with a look at goal. Her shot rose, but eventually crashed into the fence behind Colgate’s net for a goal kick. It was her third shot in a three-minute span which saw Syracuse dictating the midfield and finding openings in the Colgate defense after an inconsistent first half going forward. Brackett said first-year head coach Nicky Adams gave the Orange forwards the “blessing” to be creative in the final third. For Brackett, it meant using her speed to open up pockets of space between defenders.Later in the second half, it meant Laurel Ness slotting home the game’s first and only goal with what Adams called a “special” left foot. The coaches only instructions were for the wingers to look for cutbacks , and Mackenzie Vlachos followed the orders to find Ness at the top of the 18-yard box, unmarked. “It’s just about reading and you know, responding to what the other team shows you,” Brackett said. The Orange started Adams’ reign with two preseason losses against Albany and Rutgers. On Sunday night, Syracuse (1-0) played the attacking type of soccer Adams wants to earn a 1-0 victory at SU Soccer Stadium against Colgate (0-2). Following a 3-15 season in which Syracuse scored just 11 goals, Adams philosophy of allowing creativity to shine through and playing attacking soccer was a welcome change, especially for the forwards, Ness said. Last year, the most shots the Orange had in a game was 18. Against Colgate, SU had 17. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe two preseason games were choppy, Brackett said, with coaches stopping play at times to go over instructions with players and the halves being shorter than the typical 45 minutes. The final results weren’t as important in those games as having a sound defense, creating better communication and making sure it all came together come the start of the season. “It’s been a while and our program has gone through a lot of change and we responded in the best possible way,” Brackett said. “All the things we worked on in training, in preseason, all the requirements we set, standards we set as a team in the summer, and everyone did them. And that’s why we won tonight.” Syracuse showed its intent from the initial whistle. Starting with the ball, the Orange attacked down the left wing to send in a cross which looped over the goal and out of play. Yells of “We’re first, we’re first” rang across the field. In the 10th minute, Brackett took the Orange’s first shot of the game, but she shanked the ball with her left foot and sent it flying well over the goal mouth. Play swung from end-to-end but rarely were through-balls weighted correctly. Holding midfielder Georgia Allen fed Meghan Root in the 27th minute for Syracuse’s best chance of the half, but Root’s shot was swallowed by the Colgate goalkeeper who had come out to close the angle.“We were getting forward but making poor decisions in the final third that kept us from really having quality opportunities,” Adams said.During halftime, Adams noted SU was getting too narrow, and out of the break, it started exploiting the wide spaces, creating openings for Brackett and the fullbacks. Adams’ offseason training focused on fitness and creativity in the final third which showed in the second half. Again, the Orange were the first to attack, creating a nice link-up play on the right wing. But Clarke Brown strayed too far and was flagged for offside. Eleven minutes into the second half, Brackett began her barrage of shots toward the net but none had to be saved by the keeper. In the first half, the Orange had looked for short passes, trying to weave their way through the Colgate defense. Now, they played more direct.  The breakthrough came in the 68th minute, when Ness was left unmarked in the 18-yard box to score her first collegiate goal. “I was able to get it right behind their entire defense, just cut it back to the right and just faked everybody out and had the goal wide open,” Ness said. “That easy.”  Ness’ score held the lead for Syracuse’s first win. While the preseason presented hurdles, Brackett said, a win on opening night inspired confidence.“It makes me so excited because if we can do that today, we can do that tomorrow, we can do that Thursday, we can do that in the ACC,” Brackett said.  Comments Published on August 25, 2019 at 11:46 pm Contact Arabdho: armajumd@syr.edu | @aromajumder last_img read more