2016 AWCON: Nigeria Draws Ghana, Mali and Kenya

first_imgThe host, Cameroun was housed in group A, seeded top and will play South Africa, Zimbabwe and Egypt.The top two teams from the preliminary stages will qualify for the knockout phase of the competition.The opening game will take place between Cameroun and Egypt at the Stade Ahmadou Ahidjo, while Nigeria gets the title defence against Mali at the Stade Municipal de Limbe.The Super Falcons will be looking to extend their dominance on the continent with an eighth African women title at this year’s edition. The competition will kick start on November 19 through December 3, 2016Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram The defending champions of the African Women’s Cup of Nations Nigeria, has been paired against Ghana, Kenya and Mali in Group B of this year tournament which is billed to take place in Cameroun.The draw ceremony held on Sunday in Yaounde, Cameroun with several African football legends including Roger Miller and Rigobert Song in attendance.last_img read more

Kadejhia Sellers is more than just fast

first_img Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Three seconds were left on the clock. Manchester Regional High School (New Jersey) was down by one. The ball was in Kadejhia Sellers’ hands, like it always was at the end of games. The star basketball player would graduate Manchester as the all-time leading scorer with 1,059 points. And Manchester just needed two.Head coach David Sposato still remembers what happened next vividly. Sellers dribbled the length of the floor, through the entire defense for a game-winning layup as the buzzer sounded.“For most people to dribble the length of the court in such a short period of time while being covered would be impossible,” Sposato said. “But due to her sheer speed, she was able to do it.”Sellers has taken her speed to the next level, now a senior leader for Syracuse in track and field. She received All-ACC honors in 2016-17. That spring, she placed third in the 400 meters at the ACC Championships. Last season was highlighted by a win in the same event at the Boston University Valentine Invitational. Her raw athleticism and leadership make her the runner she is.“She’s the kind of kid that I’d love it if she had eight years of eligibility and we can go ahead and play with her being a 60-meter runner one year and play with being a 200-meter runner one year,” Syracuse assistant coach Dave Hegland, who coaches the sprinters, said. “I just think she could do a lot. She’s got a really wide range of abilities.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSellers’ mom, Patsy Waters, remembers when Sellers was little and played outside, developing the versatility that would propel her. During games of hide and seek, Sellers would sprint and be the first one hidden. She was never caught.“She just moves really, really quick,” Waters said.  “So I was like, ‘wow.’ And she has really long legs, too.”When she moved from South Carolina to New Jersey her sophomore year of high school, she landed a spot on the Manchester basketball team.The 2014-15 season was Manchester’s best in three decades. After Sellers graduated, it went from 15 wins to five wins the next year. Sposato said she still holds an “iconic” role in school history. Her number, 20, has not been worn since she left. It didn’t matter if she were exhausted, Sposato said. With their fast pace style of play, she normally was. But when the team needed her late, she would kick into another gear.“It’s a great thing when your best player is also your hardest worker,” Sposato said. “So the rest of your team is working their butts off because you have a girl who’s a stud, who’s all out sprinting and coming early and putting the time in.”She ran track before she moved states, though only in the outdoor season because of basketball. She threw discus — not every meet, she was just “playing around” — and nearly broke a school record on her first throw. She’s also ran the 60 meters in 7.37 seconds which Hegland called “exceptional” for a 400-meter runner.Anna Henderson | Digital Design EditorSposato believed that even if she was taught volleyball, she would’ve been the best player on the court. Hegland wishes there was more time in each season so he could have really seen what she could do.At Manchester, a fast time in the 400-meters in her junior year caught the attention of schools like Syracuse. Hegland said the more the staff learned about Sellers, the more they liked her.“The fact that she was playing basketball and playing at a high level, that helped her,” Hegland said. “She picks up on new things really quick … She’s a very adaptive athlete.”Some Division II schools offered to bring her in for both basketball and track. But Sellers said she recognized that while her passion was basketball, her talent was track. She could do more with it.When Sellers got to SU, she had to make adjustments. Running indoors for the first time, she had to learn how to cut into lanes quicker, as well as adjust to different lengths.“Mentally it kind of messes you up, whereas outdoor you’re just running one lap and indoor is two laps,” Sellers said.But she fit in quickly, becoming All-ACC in indoor, not outdoor. Hegland was impressed with how well she faced the steep learning curve. As the only senior female sprinter on the roster, it’s now her turn to help the younger runners make their adjustments.“She always has a plan and a goal not only for herself, but for the whole team,” Alexis Crosby, a freshman teammate, said. “So it’s been an inspiration to be around her and to just learn from her.”While Sellers specializes in the 400-meter run, she has been used elsewhere — and has found success. She finished second in the 200-meter race in the 2017 BU Valentine invitational. In the 2015 Cornell Greg Page Relays, she won the 300-meters.But no matter what Sellers does, her philosophy remains the same.“Everything I do, I have to make sure I do it in excellence,” Sellers said. “Because if I do it in excellence, then the team will follow that excellence.”center_img Published on January 30, 2019 at 1:01 am Contact Eric: estorms@syr.edulast_img read more

Syracuse edges Colgate, 1-0, in Nicky Adams’ head coaching debut

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ A flick-on by Syracuse’s Kailee Coonan in the midfield sent Sydney Brackett between two Colgate defenders with a look at goal. Her shot rose, but eventually crashed into the fence behind Colgate’s net for a goal kick. It was her third shot in a three-minute span which saw Syracuse dictating the midfield and finding openings in the Colgate defense after an inconsistent first half going forward. Brackett said first-year head coach Nicky Adams gave the Orange forwards the “blessing” to be creative in the final third. For Brackett, it meant using her speed to open up pockets of space between defenders.Later in the second half, it meant Laurel Ness slotting home the game’s first and only goal with what Adams called a “special” left foot. The coaches only instructions were for the wingers to look for cutbacks , and Mackenzie Vlachos followed the orders to find Ness at the top of the 18-yard box, unmarked. “It’s just about reading and you know, responding to what the other team shows you,” Brackett said. The Orange started Adams’ reign with two preseason losses against Albany and Rutgers. On Sunday night, Syracuse (1-0) played the attacking type of soccer Adams wants to earn a 1-0 victory at SU Soccer Stadium against Colgate (0-2). Following a 3-15 season in which Syracuse scored just 11 goals, Adams philosophy of allowing creativity to shine through and playing attacking soccer was a welcome change, especially for the forwards, Ness said. Last year, the most shots the Orange had in a game was 18. Against Colgate, SU had 17. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe two preseason games were choppy, Brackett said, with coaches stopping play at times to go over instructions with players and the halves being shorter than the typical 45 minutes. The final results weren’t as important in those games as having a sound defense, creating better communication and making sure it all came together come the start of the season. “It’s been a while and our program has gone through a lot of change and we responded in the best possible way,” Brackett said. “All the things we worked on in training, in preseason, all the requirements we set, standards we set as a team in the summer, and everyone did them. And that’s why we won tonight.” Syracuse showed its intent from the initial whistle. Starting with the ball, the Orange attacked down the left wing to send in a cross which looped over the goal and out of play. Yells of “We’re first, we’re first” rang across the field. In the 10th minute, Brackett took the Orange’s first shot of the game, but she shanked the ball with her left foot and sent it flying well over the goal mouth. Play swung from end-to-end but rarely were through-balls weighted correctly. Holding midfielder Georgia Allen fed Meghan Root in the 27th minute for Syracuse’s best chance of the half, but Root’s shot was swallowed by the Colgate goalkeeper who had come out to close the angle.“We were getting forward but making poor decisions in the final third that kept us from really having quality opportunities,” Adams said.During halftime, Adams noted SU was getting too narrow, and out of the break, it started exploiting the wide spaces, creating openings for Brackett and the fullbacks. Adams’ offseason training focused on fitness and creativity in the final third which showed in the second half. Again, the Orange were the first to attack, creating a nice link-up play on the right wing. But Clarke Brown strayed too far and was flagged for offside. Eleven minutes into the second half, Brackett began her barrage of shots toward the net but none had to be saved by the keeper. In the first half, the Orange had looked for short passes, trying to weave their way through the Colgate defense. Now, they played more direct.  The breakthrough came in the 68th minute, when Ness was left unmarked in the 18-yard box to score her first collegiate goal. “I was able to get it right behind their entire defense, just cut it back to the right and just faked everybody out and had the goal wide open,” Ness said. “That easy.”  Ness’ score held the lead for Syracuse’s first win. While the preseason presented hurdles, Brackett said, a win on opening night inspired confidence.“It makes me so excited because if we can do that today, we can do that tomorrow, we can do that Thursday, we can do that in the ACC,” Brackett said.  Comments Published on August 25, 2019 at 11:46 pm Contact Arabdho: armajumd@syr.edu | @aromajumder last_img read more

Iowa kicker Keith Duncan blows farewell kisses to Nebraska’s bowl hopes, gets scholarship

first_imgKEITH DUNCAN WAGGING HIS FINGER AND BLOWING A KISS TO SCOTT FROSTMY HERO 🐐🐐🐐 pic.twitter.com/ruz0CPZTDx— Matt (@letsgohawks12) November 29, 2019“Just having some fun,” Duncan told reporters after the game. “Nebraska fans came for some entertainment and that’s what football is. It’s entertainment. Just having some fun with it.”MORE: Virginia finally beats in-state rival VT No. 17 Iowa capped its nine-win regular season with a dramatic 27-24 victory over Nebraska on Friday, claiming bragging rights when kicker Keith Duncan converted a 48-yard field goal with one second remaining.Duncan celebrated his kick by blowing a kiss and gesturing with his finger in the direction of Cornhuskers sideline. Nebraska coach Scott Frost tried to ice Duncan by calling consecutive timeouts. After the game, Duncan was awarded a scholarship by the coaching staff. He is considered one of the best kickers in college football having now gone 29 for 34 on field-goal attempts this season.Making the win even sweeter for Iowa was what it meant to Nebraska. The Cornhuskers would have been in position to reach a bowl game if they had won, but instead dropped to 5-7.Nebraska had the ball with less than two minutes left in regulation, but it failed to net a single first down, thus allowing Iowa to stage a game-winning drive.last_img read more