Go back to the enewsletter Delta Air Lines and Dis

first_imgGo back to the enewsletterDelta Air Lines and Discover Los Angeles have launched a nationwide incentive for trade agents, offering the chance to win one of three star-studded trips to the 61st GRAMMY Awards in LA in 2019.The incentive runs from 12 October–14 December 2018 and aims to educate agents on the new cabin products – including the DeltaOne suite in Business and Delta Premium Select in Premium Economy – on Delta’s modified Boeing 777 aircraft, which will launch on the Sydney-LAX route in April 2019. Eligible consultants will be in the running to win an exclusive experience in February, including return flights, accommodation at one of the city’s trendiest properties Hotel Figueroa, an invitation to Delta’s pre-GRAMMY Awards party and the GRAMMY Awards, plus much more.The three major prizes include:Return economy flights to L.A. for two people on DeltaTwo bronze tickets to the 2019 GRAMMY AwardsTwo tickets to Delta’s GRAMMY pre-partyThree nights’ accommodation at Hotel Figueroa: 9-12 Feb for two people twin shareReturn LAX Airport transfers for two peopleTwo tickets to the GRAMMY Museum® at L.A. LiveTwo tickets to Warner Bros Studio Tour HollywoodOne $100 USD Westfield L.A. shopping gift cardAgents will also have the chance to win weekly entertainment-themed prizes throughout the eight-week incentive, including Apple Music Gift Cards, Gold Class movie vouchers and Coles/Myer Gift Cards.To be eligible, travel trade professionals will need to sell a minimum of two Australia–Los Angeles Delta tickets, learn the new features of Delta’s modified Boeing 777 and complete a short product questionnaire, and Discover L.A.’s online training tool, L.A. Insider, which is designed to better help sell the City of Angels.For further information on the incentive, visit: https://winyourwaytola.com.au/Go back to the enewsletterlast_img read more

Exotic particles called pentaquarks may be less weird than previously thought

first_img Particles Peter Ginter/CERN c Flavors Four years ago, when experimenters spotted pentaquarks—exotic, short-lived particles made of five quarks—some physicists thought they had glimpsed the strong nuclear force, which binds the atomic nucleus, engaging in a bizarre new trick. New observations have now expanded the zoo of pentaquarks, but suggest a tamer explanation for their structure. The findings, from the Large Hadron Collider beauty experiment (LHCb), a particle detector fed by the LHC at CERN, the European particle physics laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland, suggest pentaquarks are not bags of five quarks binding in a new way, but are more like conventional atomic nuclei.”I’m really excited that the new data send such a clear message,” says Tomasz Skwarnicki, an LHCb physicist at Syracuse University in New York who led the study. But, he notes, “It may not be the message some people had hoped for.”Pentaquarks are heavier cousins of protons and neutrons, which are also made of quarks. In ordinary matter, quarks come in two types, up and down. Atom smashers can blast four heavier types of quarks into brief existence: charm, strange, top, and bottom. Quarks cling to one another through the strong force so mightily they cannot be isolated. Instead, they are almost always found in groups of three in particles known as baryons—including the proton and neutron—or in pairs called mesons, which consist of a quark and an antimatter quark. c – u Gluon V. ALTOUNIAN/SCIENCE c Pack your bags Quarks, usually found in trios or pairs, come in six flavors and three colors, akin to electric charge. New pentaquarks may resemble molecules rather than bags of individual quarks. u Baryon The Large Hadron Collider beauty experiment has discovered three new pentaquarks. c “Bag of quarks” pentaquark Meson Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img u Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Antiquark Up (u)Down (d)Charm (c) Quark By Adrian ChoJun. 5, 2019 , 12:10 PM c d “Molecule” pentaquark Exotic particles called pentaquarks may be less weird than previously thought – Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country d u Email But for decades, some theorists have hypothesized the existence of larger bundles of quarks. In recent years, experimenters have found evidence for four-quark particles, or tetraquarks. Then, in 2015, LHCb reported signs of two pentaquarks.Some theorists argue that the new particles are bags of four and five quarks, bound together through the exchange of quantum particles called gluons, adding a new wrinkle to the often intractable theory of the strong force. Others argue they’re more like an atomic nucleus. In this “molecular” picture a pentaquark is a three-quark baryon stuck to a two-quark meson the same way that protons and neutrons bind in a nucleus—by exchanging short-lived pi mesons.LHCb’s new pentaquarks, reported today in Physical Review Letters (PRL), bolster the molecular picture. In 2015, LHCb researchers reported a pentaquark with a mass of 4450 megaelectron volts (MeV), 4.74 times the mass of the proton. With nine times more data, they now find in that mass range two nearly overlapping but separate pentaquarks with masses of 4440 MeV and 4457 MeV. They also find a lighter pentaquark at 4312 MeV. Each contains the same set of quarks: charm, anticharm, two ups, and a down. (Previous hints of a pentaquark at 4380 MeV have faded.) The lightest pentaquark has a mass just below the sum of a particular baryon and meson that together contain the correct quark ingredients. The heavier pentaquarks have masses just below the sum of the same baryon and a related meson with extra internal energy. That suggests each pentaquark is just a baryon bound to a meson, with a tiny bit of mass taken up in binding energy. “This is a no-brainer explanation,” says Marek Karliner, a theorist at Tel Aviv University in Israel.The molecular picture also helps explain why the pentaquarks, although fleeting, appear to be more stable than expected, Karliner says. That’s because packaging the charm quark in the baryon and anticharm quark in the meson separates them, keeping them from annihilating each other.Other theorists rushed to a similar conclusion when LHCb researchers discussed their results at a conference in La Thuile, Italy, in March. For example, within a day, Li-Sheng Geng, a theorist at Beihang University in Beijing, and colleagues posted a paper, in press at PRL, that uses the molecular picture to predict the existence of four more pentaquarks that should be within LHCb’s reach.But the bag-of-quarks picture is not dead. Pentaquarks should occasionally form when protons are bombarded with gamma ray photons, as physicists at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, Virginia, are trying to do. But they have yet to spot any pentaquarks. That undermines the molecular picture because it predicts higher rates for such photoproduction than the bag-of-quarks model does, says Ahmed Ali, a theorist at DESY, the German accelerator laboratory in Hamburg. “They are already almost excluding the molecular interpretation,” he says. Others say it’s too early to draw such conclusions.The structure of pentaquarks isn’t necessarily an either/or proposition, notes Feng-Kun Guo, a theorist at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing. Quantum mechanics allows a tiny object to be both a particle and a wave, or to be in two places at once. Similarly, a pentaquark could have both structures simultaneously. “It’s just a question of which one is dominant,” Guo says.Regardless of the binding mechanism, the new pentaquarks are exciting because they suggest the existence of a whole new family of such particles, Karliner says. “It’s like a whole new periodic table.”*Correction, 6 June, 4 p.m.: The story has been updated to reflect that although new data weaken the case for a pentaquark with a mass of 4380 megaelectronvolts, they do not rule it out.last_img read more